The Races

Queen BC
HM THE QUEEN PATS BLACK CAVIAR AFTER THE RUNNING OF THE 2012 DIAMOND JUBILEE STAKES

Major Races

The Queen Anne Stakes- Day 1

A Group 1 flat horse race open to thoroughbreds aged four years or older. It is run  over a distance of 1 mile (1,609 metres), The race was created in 1840, and for the first part of its history it was called the Trial Stakes. In its original form it was contested by horses aged three or older. The title was changed in 1930 to commemorate Queen Anne, the monarch who established racing at Ascot in 1711

When the current system of race grading was introduced in 1971, the Queen Anne Stakes was classed at Group 3 level, and it was subsequently promoted to Group 2 in 1984. It was given Group 1 status in 2003, and simultaneously the minimum age was raised to four. It is presently the first race on the opening day of the Royal Ascot meeting.  In 2015 we saw Frankel win in arguably the greatest performance of a thoroughbred ever, although Secretariat fans might argue that point.

The King’s Stand Stakes- Day 1

A Group 1 flat horse race open to thoroughbreds aged three years or older. It is run over a distance of 5 furlongs (1,006 metres).

The event was created as a result of bad weather at Royal Ascot in 1860. Heavy rain made it impossible to run the Royal Stand Plate over its usual distance of 2 miles, and so it was shortened to the only raceable part of the course, 5 furlongs. The amended race was titled the Queen’s Stand Plate, and in time it became the most important sprint at the Royal meeting. During its early years the event was open to horses aged two or older. Its name was changed to the King’s Stand Stakes in 1901, following the death of Queen Victoria and the accession of King Edward VII.

The current system of race grading was introduced in 1971, and the King’s Stand Stakes was given Group 1 status in 1973. It was downgraded to Group 2 level in 1988 so that another event, the Haydock Sprint Cup, could be promoted.

The King’s Stand Stakes became part of a new international race series, the Global Sprint Challenge, in 2005. It consequently featured a number of high-quality contenders from overseas, and it regained Group 1 status in 2008. It is now the fourth leg of the series, preceded by the KrisFlyer International Sprint and followed by the Golden Jubilee Stakes. It is presently run on the opening day of the Royal Ascot meeting.

Many Australian horses have won the King’s Stand Stakes including the great Takeover Target (pictured below), trained by past tour participant Joe Janiak, in 2006.

If you come with us, remind Geoff to tell you the ‘Joe Janiak meets The Queen’ story.  It’s a classic.

target
The remarkable Takeover Target who raced in both the King’s Stand and Golden Jubilee Stakes (now Diamond Jubilee Stakes) for three years running, 2006-2008, recording a win, two seconds, a third and two fourths.
The Gold Cup- Day 3

A Group 1 flat horse race that is open to thoroughbreds aged four years or older. It is run over a distance of 2 miles and 4 furlongs (4,023 metres)

It is Britain’s most prestigious event for stayers.  It is traditionally held on day three of the Royal Ascot meeting, which is known colloquially (but not officially) as Ladies’ Day. Contrary to popular belief the actual title of the race does not include the word “Ascot”.

The amazing Yeats won 4 consecutive Gold Cups. Her Majesty The Queen unveiled his statue in the Parade Ring at Royal Ascot in 2011.  Yeats now stands at Coolmore Ireland.

The Queen herself owned the winner of the 2013 Gold Cup, Estimate, trained by Sir Michael Stoute. We were lucky enough to meet Estimate at Sir Michael’s yard in Newmarket in 2012.

The Diamond Jubilee Stakes- Day 5

A Group 1 flat horse race in Great Britain which is open to thoroughbreds aged three years or older. It is run over a distance of 6 furlongs (1,207 metres).

The event was established in 1868, and it was originally called the All-Aged Stakes. Its title was changed to the Cork and Orrery Stakes in 1926, in honour of the 9th Earl of Cork, who had served as the Master of the Buckhounds in the 19th century.

When the current system of race grading was introduced in 1971, the Cork and Orrery Stakes was classed at Group 3 level. It was promoted to Group 2 status in 1998. It was renamed in 2002 to commemorate the Golden Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II, and simultaneously it was raised to the highest grade, Group 1.

The Golden Jubilee Stakes became part of a new international race series, the Global Sprint Challenge, in 2005. It has consequently featured a number of high-quality contenders from overseas. It is now the fifth leg of the series, preceded by the King’s Stand Stakes and followed by the July Cup. It is presently run on the final day of the Royal Ascot meeting.

Australia’s Starspangledbanner won the 2010 Golden Jubilee Stakes.  In 2011 Star Witness ran a creditable third, backing up from a fine second in the King’s Stand 5 days earlier. He is now a leading sire in Australia.

In 2012 it was renamed the Diamond Jubilee Stakes to honour The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee.

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